FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions
 
 

about the project
+what is the project?

what is the project?

what is the project?

MVV are proposing a new, state of the art, energy from waste combined heat and power facility (EfW CHP), to be built on the existing waste management site on the Algores Way industrial estate. Given its location, we have adopted the name “Medworth” after the ward in which the site sits.

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility will recover useful energy in the form of electricity and steam from over half a million tonnes of non-recyclable (residual) municipal waste each year. 

Generating over 50 megawatts, the electricity will be sent to the grid or to major industries in the area, offering them competitive energy supplies. Steam will also be available at competitive levels, allowing users to switch off their conventional fossil fuelled boilers. 

+why has Medworth, Wisbech been selected?

why Medworth / Wisbech?

why Medworth / Wisbech?

The proposed site is in the Medworth ward of Fenland District Council. Some of the non-recyclable waste from the east of England region is currently exported to continental Europe where it is used as fuel in Energy from Waste facilities. 

MVV look to bring their expertise to the area and create a new business for Wisbech to avoid transporting the waste overseas and to generate renewable energy for local businesses.

The industrial area in the Wisbech ward of Medworth offers the perfect opportunity to achieve high efficiencies with Combined Heat and Power (CHP). This means that some of the steam produced by burning the waste could be used for heating or industrial processes, avoiding the use of fossil fuels. 

Such steam supplies would also increase the efficiency of the proposed facility by increasing the amount of energy put to good use. We have already started talking to local companies about the opportunities to do this.

+where will it be?

where will it be?

where will it be?

The proposed site is the industrial area in the Medworth Ward of Wisbech. The Medworth Ward offers the perfect opportunity to achieve high efficiencies with Combined Heat and Power (CHP). 

This means that some of the steam produced by burning the waste could be used for heating or industrial processes, avoiding the use of fossil fuels. Such steam supplies would also increase the efficiency of the proposed facility by increasing the amount of energy put to good use.

We have already started talking to local companies about the opportunities to do this. 

about MVV
+who are MVV?

who are MVV?

who are MVV?

MVV Environment is part of the MVV Energie group of companies, providing sustainable and efficient solutions for waste-fired energy generation to publicly and privately-owned waste disposal companies as well as to Local Authorities.

The UK business retains the overall group ethos of ‘belonging’ to the communities we serve whilst benefitting from over 50 years’ experience gained by our German sister companies. In the UK, MVV currently consists of five separate companies:

  • MVV Environment Limited – the UK development company and core business support functions
  • MVV Environment Baldovie – diverting 110,000 tonnes per annum of residual waste from landfill for Dundee City and Angus councils 
  • MVV Environment Devonport –diverting 200,000 tonnes per annum of residual waste from landfill for the South West Devon Waste Partnership as well as 50,000 tonnes per annum of residual waste for private waste disposal companies
  • MVV Environment Ridham – generating energy from 175,000 tonnes per annum of waste wood that would otherwise be landfilled or exported for energy generation abroad
  • MVV Environment Services – the UK electricity trading subsidiary of MVV

Find out more

+what experience do MVV have in EfW technology?

what experience do MVV have in EfW technology?

what experience do MVV have in EfW technology?

Our largest project in the UK so far is the Devonport Energy from Waste Combined Heat and Power Facility in Plymouth.  Since 2015, this modern and efficient facility has been using around 250,000 tonnes of household, commercial and industrial residual waste per year to generate electricity and heat in Plymouth.  

In the “Partnership Awards” our facility was awarded first prize in three categories –

  • Best Project category
  • Best Waste/Water/Energy Project category
  • Best Local Management Team” category

Find out more

+do MVV have experience in other renewable energy technologies?

do MVV have experience in other renewable energy technologies?

do MVV have experience in other renewable energy technologies?

Biomass is another key focus of our activities in the British market and demonstrates our responsibility towards society when it comes to promoting the use of renewable energy.  Our biomass power plant at Ridham Dock, Kent, uses 172,000 tonnes of waste and non-recyclable wood per year to generate green electricity and potentially heat as well.

Find out more

about Energy from Waste
+what is Energy from Waste?

what is Energy from Waste?

what is Energy from Waste?

Energy from Waste (or EfW) is the generation of electricity and/or usable heat from non-recyclable waste that would otherwise go to landfill in the UK, or be transported to other countries as ‘Refuse Derived Fuel’ which is then burned to generate electricity and/or heat overseas.

The heat from the burning waste is used to boil water and generate steam which turns a turbine to drive a generator. Efficiencies can be increased if some of the steam can be used for heating, for example in industrial processes such as cooking food.

Find out more

+why is EfW a better solution than landfill?

why is EfW a better solution than landfill?

why is EfW a better solution than landfill?

Landfill sites produce methane, which is 25 times worse than CO2 as a greenhouse gas and exporting waste requires it to be shredded, baled and transported far greater distances than treating it locally.  Shredding, baling and transport all generate more CO2, which can be avoided with a local solution.

Find out more

+what happens to the electricity and heat generated?

what happens to the electricity and heat generated?

what happens to the electricity and heat generated?

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility would, if approved, be able to supply electricity and heat to certain businesses in the local area, offering those companies lower energy costs and a renewable energy alternative to using fossil fuels. Surplus electricity would be sold on to the national grid.

about the waste
+where will the waste come from?

where will the waste come from?

where will the waste come from?

If approved, the Medworth EfW CHP Facility waste will come from the region. Waste companies will want to deal with waste as close to its source as possible, to control transport costs. 

+how much waste will it deal with?

how much waste will it deal with?

how much waste will it deal with?

In the UK now, there is over 15 million* tonnes of non-recyclable (or residual) waste per year that is still going to landfill or being shipped abroad for disposal.

The plant is designed to treat over half a million tonnes per year of waste. The actual amount will be determined by the energy content of the waste; the lower the energy content, the more that can be treated, conversely with a higher energy content, less waste would be treated.

*source Tolvik Consulting, February 2019

+will you be importing waste from overseas?

will you be importing waste from overseas?

will you be importing waste from overseas?

No. On average over three million tonnes of waste is currently exported each year to Europe, this is due to the lack of domestic waste management infrastructure.

+what wastes will you accept?

what wastes will you accept?

what wastes will you accept?

We would source non-hazardous household and business waste from the region which currently goes to landfill or for export. The exact wastes that can be accepted will be specified in an Environmental Permit issued by the Environment Agency based on European Waste Catalogue (EWC) codes.

While the permit is likely to allow a reasonably wide range of suitable non-hazardous wastes, the vast majority of the waste we will accept is most likely to fall within three EWC codes, namely:

  • 20 03 01 – Mixed Municipal Waste
  • 19 12 10 – Combustible Waste (Refuse Derived Fuel)
  • 19 12 12 – Other wastes (including mixtures of materials) from the mechanical treatment of waste
+will there be plastic in the waste?

will there be plastic in the waste?

will there be plastic in the waste?

There will be an element of plastic in the waste stream. This represents those types of plastic that cannot yet be easily recycled, as well as plastic that remains after businesses or householders have separated out their recyclable waste. 

Plastics that have been collected for, and are suitable for, recycling cannot be accepted by MVV under the standard conditions of an environmental permit.

+will the waste be checked to make sure it doesn't contain anything it shouldn't?

will the waste be checked to make sure it doesn't contain anything it shouldn't?

will the waste be checked to make sure it doesn't contain anything it shouldn't?

In the UK, those involved in the production, control, storage, transport or treatment of waste are bound by a Duty of Care as set out in the Environmental Protection Act. As such, the treatment of waste is well controlled and documented. 

Only waste that complies with the environmental permit will be accepted. In the event that non-compliant waste is identified, it will be removed from site for safe disposal/treatment.

+why can’t money be spent on improving recycling rates instead?

why can’t money be spent on improving recycling rates instead?

why can’t money be spent on improving recycling rates instead?

This is a matter for local and County Council. It is worth noting that MVV do not target municipal recyclable waste, and as such our facilities have no direct impact on municipal recycling rates in the county. EfW competes with landfill, not recycling.

+if we are moving to a circular economy, how can you be sure there will be enough waste for the lifetime of the facility?

if we are moving to a circular economy, can you be sure there will be enough waste for the lifetime of the facility?

if we are moving to a circular economy, can you be sure there will be enough waste for the lifetime of the facility?

MVV supports the transition towards a circular economy. We acknowledge that within a circular economy there will still be materials that have reached the 'end of life' point and are only suitable for energy recovery.

When considering developing a facility, we calculate the amount of waste being produced that is currently either being sent to landfill or exported overseas. We also look at Government targets for recycling and our need to embrace a circular economy, to ascertain how much the available fuel would be reduced if these targets were successfully reached.

benefits to the local community
+what are the benefits to the local community?

what are the benefits to the local community?

what are the benefits to the local community?

The proposed EfW CHP facility at Medworth, has a number of significant local benefits. Many of these benefits are long term and sustainable and contribute significantly to individuals and businesses in Wisbech. The main benefits are:

Our investment of over £300 million is likely to attract further quality development in the area around the site via supply of sustainable electricity and heat.

+lower cost renewable energy for local industry

lower cost renewable energy for local industry

lower cost renewable energy for local industry

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility would, if approved, be able to supply electricity and heat to certain businesses in the local area, offering those companies lower energy costs and a renewable energy alternative to using fossil fuels.

+will there be employment opportunities?

will there be employment opportunities?

will there be employment opportunities?

If the development is approved, it will generate up to 700 jobs throughout the construction period as well as requiring additional goods and services which MVV will always endeavour to source locally.

Beyond construction, the completed facility would employ about 40 staff in a range of skilled roles. In addition to the full-time staffing requirements, we would also need other goods and services such as cleaning, catering and maintenance staff, all of which will generate further local employment.

We will work with local schools, colleges and universities to offer opportunities to upskill local young people in the areas of construction, engineering, waste management and sustainability.

+will there be an education programme?

will there be an education programme?

will there be an education programme?

As the Facility will be both a waste management plant and a power plant, we will develop an education programme for local schools, colleges and universities with a focus on waste, resources and renewable energy. 

Community visits to the Facility will also be encouraged to develop a more personal sense of responsibility towards waste management and the need to reduce the amount of waste we produce.

about the impact on local air quality
+what is the impact on local air quality?

what is the impact on local air quality?

what is the impact on local air quality?

Thanks to state-of-the-art flue gas cleaning, our power facilities comply with the very strict European regulations for clean air.

EfW accounts for a very small part (0.02%) of total particulate emissions in the UK annually. According to the Health Protection Agency, by comparison, industry and traffic account for about 40% of particulate emissions.

+is EfW a major source of dioxins?

is EfW a major source of dioxins?

is EfW a major source of dioxins?

No. In the past, EfW plants were a significant source of dioxins, but following reductions in emission limits in 1995 and 2000, EfW now accounts for less than 1% of the overall dioxin emissions to the air in the UK.

In fact, dioxin emissions from EfW in the UK have changed dramatically, with a 99.8% reduction in dioxin emissions per tonne of waste since 1990. This is due to highly sophisticated flue gas cleaning systems.

+what safety measures are designed into the facility to ensure air quality protection, even when there’s an equipment failure?

what safety measures are designed into the facility to ensure air quality protection, even when there’s an equipment failure?

what safety measures are designed into the facility to ensure air quality protection, even when there’s an equipment failure?

Safety is of the utmost importance and the system is designed to ensure that emissions to air are controlled even in the event of equipment failure.

Sophisticated monitoring techniques throughout the process, from combustion through to filtration of the flue gases ensure that the facility operates within the limits of the Environmental Permit.

+will air quality monitoring results be made available to the public?

will air quality monitoring results be made available to the public?

will air quality monitoring results be made available to the public?

If approved, MVV will voluntarily publish the weekly emission values for the Medworth EfW CHP facility; we will offer interested parties the opportunity to stay informed about the positive environmental impacts of our facility.

A direct comparison of the average daily values with the legal limits will be available on our website.

+who monitors waste-to-energy facilities in the UK?

who monitors waste-to-energy facilities in the UK?

who monitors waste-to-energy facilities in the UK?

The Environment Agency (EA) regulate all waste sites and act as independent ’police’ of a facility’s outputs. If limits were breached, the EA has the power to shut down the plant and impose fines accordingly.

MVV monitors the majority of emissions from the facility continuously. Other trace emissions must be monitored by extractive sampling as they are present in such tiny amounts; this is carried out at regular intervals as required by the Environmental Permit.

The emissions data is logged and stored and reported to the Environment Agency. 

the impact on the environment
+what is the impact on the environment?

what is the impact on the environment?

what is the impact on the environment?

EfW replaces landfill and contributes to renewable energy generation, reducing the UK’s reliance on fossil fuels and cutting methane (CH4) emissions.

Currently 48% of the UK’s electricity is still generated by burning fossil fuels so there is a need to increase the amount of renewable energy generated.

In the UK, landfill accounts for 30% of methane production, which is 25 times more harmful as a greenhouse gas than CO2.

+will the facility smell?

will the facility smell?

will the facility smell?

Off-site odour will be controlled through a number of operational measures, including good housekeeping.

The waste being delivered to site will be the main source of odour and deliveries will take place inside an enclosed tipping hall.

Smelly air from the tipping hall will be drawn into the combustion chamber and burnt; as a result, fresh air will be drawn into the tipping hall from outside so that the flow of air prevents escape of odours.

+will the facility be noisy?

will the facility be noisy?

will the facility be noisy?

We have demonstrated at our Plymouth facility that we can operate within 65m of housing without causing a nuisance to the local residents.

Modern cladding and insulation techniques, as well as careful planning of the layout will minimise any noise outside of the site boundary.

+what will you do to make sure the facility doesn't attract pests and vermin?

what will you do to make sure the facility doesn't attract pests and vermin?

what will you do to make sure the facility doesn't attract pests and vermin?

All responsible waste sites have pest and vermin control measures in place and this will be the case for the Medworth site.

Good housekeeping in terms of litter and odour control will ensure that additional pests and vermin will not be attracted to the site; pests and vermin may, of course, be delivered in/with the waste but these will be confined to the waste bunker from which they cannot escape – they will eventually end up in the furnace!

+will environmental impacts be assessed?

will environmental impacts be assessed?

will environmental impacts be assessed?

Like all significant development proposals, an Environmental Impact Assessment, for both construction and operation of the facility will be undertaken and reported by MVV in a document called an Environmental Statement.

The Environmental Statement reports on a range of potential environmental impacts and if necessary outlines measures to mitigate these. The scope of environmental impacts to be assessed is formally confirmed by the Planning Inspectorate through a process known as ‘Scoping’.

In preparing its ‘Scoping Opinion’ the Planning Inspectorate will consult prescribed consultees, such as the Environment Agency, Highways Authorities and Public Health England to determine how and what environmental impacts MVV needs to assess.

MVV will be asking the Planning Inspectorate for a Scoping Opinion so we can complete our environmental surveys of the site and its surroundings and prepare the Environmental Statement.

We have to wait for the formal Scoping Opinion to be issued, however based on our experience of developing similar facilities in the UK, we anticipate the likely environmental assessments would include:

  • air quality & health
  • traffic & transportation
  • landscape & visual
  • noise & vibration
  • ecology & nature conservation
  • surface water & flood risk
  • ground conditions
  • heritage
  • socio-economics & land use

Further information about the Scoping process is available on the Planning Inspectorates Website.

transport & traffic
+how will MVV manage the impact transport and traffic will have?

how will MVV manage the impact transport and traffic will have?

how will MVV manage the impact transport and traffic will have?

MVV will carefully look at local road networks and available waste in the area in order to develop a transport plan that will minimise impact on the existing infrastructure.

+how will you stop facility traffic impacting local work and school traffic?

how will you stop facility traffic impacting local work and school traffic?

how will you stop facility traffic impacting local work and school traffic?

An operational traffic and transport plan will be developed to minimise peak hour deliveries and ensure that delivery routes do not conflict (where reasonably practicable) with work and school traffic.

Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project
+what is a 'Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project'?

what is a 'Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project'?

what is a 'Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project'?

Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIPs) are large scale developments relating to energy, transport, water and/or waste which meet certain thresholds set out in the Planning Act 2008.

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility is an NSIP because it would have a capacity of more than 50 megawatts.

Find out more

+what is a Development Consent Order?

what is a Development Consent Order?

what is a Development Consent Order?

A Development Consent Order (DCO) is a special type of planning permission for developments that are considered to be NSIPs. The process for obtaining a DCO is set out in the Planning Act 2008. 

Instead of the local planning authority, DCO applications are dealt with by the Planning Inspectorate (PINS). PINS examine the application and make a recommendation to the Secretary of State whether to approve or refuse the application. The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy then makes the decision.

Find out more

+how does the DCO process work?

how does the DCO process work?

how does the DCO process work?

There are six stages in the DCO process:

  • Pre-application
  • Acceptance
  • Pre-examination
  • Examination
  • Recommendation and Decision
  • Post-decision

An overview of each of these stages, including how you would be involved in each stage is set out on the PlNS website.

+what is the Planning Inspectorate?

what is the Planning Inspectorate?

what is the Planning Inspectorate?

The Planning Inspectorate, (PINS), deals with National Infrastructure Project planning applications in England and Wales. Their job is to make decisions about land use and other planning-related issues in a fair, open and timely manner. 

They implement the government’s aims of sustainable development through shaping positive local planning and supporting economic growth in relation to energy, transport, water and/or waste.

PINS implement government policy whilst carefully considering the interests of developers, local citizens and other interested parties.

Find out more

+how do I contact the Planning Inspectorate?

how do I contact the Planning Inspectorate?

PINS have set up a dedicated project website where formal documents relating to our project can be downloaded.

These documents can be accessed on their website here.

If you would like to contact PINS about our project, you can email them at medworth@planninginspectorate.gov.uk

what happens next?
+what happens next?

what happens next?

what happens next?

We are developing the proposals for this project and it is especially important that we seek the views of local people and local councils. Our history as a public utilities company in Germany endures in our approach to new developments and we understand how important local people are to any new project. 

We will firstly ask the Planning Inspectorate for a Scoping Opinion so we can complete our environmental surveys of the site and its surroundings and prepare the Environmental Statement.

We will then hold a series of consultation events, where you will be able to have your say on the project and MVV staff will be available to answer questions and explain what the project will entail. These consultations will provide you with the opportunity to influence and comment on the project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it can be improved.

The consultation process will welcome comments and questions from the local community and businesses as well as a range of other stakeholders.

 

These events were originally scheduled during the weeks beginning 30th March and 20th April. Having monitored the Coronavirus situation in the UK closely over the past few days, and based on the most recently updated Government guidance, MVV has postponed the planned public events until further notice.

Postponing these events is not a decision we have taken lightly. We are committed to playing an active role in engaging with the local community and this first non-statutory consultation is an important opportunity to introduce our proposals and gather feedback.

Click here for updates on the rearrangement of our non-statutory public consultation events.

+how will MVV engage with the local community?

how will MVV engage with the local community?

how will MVV engage with the local community?

Our history as a public utilities company endures in our approach to new developments and we understand how important local people are to any new project. Throughout the consultation and consideration process, we will employ local companies and hire local venues to hold events in order to better understand the community we are joining.

Throughout any development, we always aim to act considerately and listen carefully to the opinions of those around us. We will employ a Community Liaison Manager from the local area so that there is always someone to communicate with face-to-face. We have always operated an ‘open door’ policy both during the planning and development process and beyond.

Our priorities as a business are always people, environment, profit – in that order.

Our staff, customers and communities are of the utmost importance and we want to hear from you. 

how can I find out more?
+how can I find out more?

how can I find out more?

how can I find out more?

This website will be updated regularly.

In the meantime, you can email us on medworth@mvvuk.co.uk if you have any questions.  

how can I have my say?
+how can I have my say?

how can I have my say?

how can I have my say?

There is an online form below, and in due course public consultation events will be widely advertised. 

These will be held at a variety of venues in the Wisbech area to facilitate attendance and benefit local businesses.

Find out more about consultation events

what is the project?

what is the project?

MVV are proposing a new, state of the art, energy from waste combined heat and power facility (EfW CHP), to be built on the existing waste management site on the Algores Way industrial estate. Given its location, we have adopted the name “Medworth” after the ward in which the site sits.

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility will recover useful energy in the form of electricity and steam from over half a million tonnes of non-recyclable (residual) municipal waste each year. 

Generating over 50 megawatts, the electricity will be sent to the grid or to major industries in the area, offering them competitive energy supplies. Steam will also be available at competitive levels, allowing users to switch off their conventional fossil fuelled boilers. 

why Medworth / Wisbech?

why Medworth / Wisbech?

The proposed site is in the Medworth ward of Fenland District Council. Some of the non-recyclable waste from the east of England region is currently exported to continental Europe where it is used as fuel in Energy from Waste facilities. 

MVV look to bring their expertise to the area and create a new business for Wisbech to avoid transporting the waste overseas and to generate renewable energy for local businesses.

The industrial area in the Wisbech ward of Medworth offers the perfect opportunity to achieve high efficiencies with Combined Heat and Power (CHP). This means that some of the steam produced by burning the waste could be used for heating or industrial processes, avoiding the use of fossil fuels. 

Such steam supplies would also increase the efficiency of the proposed facility by increasing the amount of energy put to good use. We have already started talking to local companies about the opportunities to do this.

where will it be?

where will it be?

The proposed site is the industrial area in the Medworth Ward of Wisbech. The Medworth Ward offers the perfect opportunity to achieve high efficiencies with Combined Heat and Power (CHP). 

This means that some of the steam produced by burning the waste could be used for heating or industrial processes, avoiding the use of fossil fuels. Such steam supplies would also increase the efficiency of the proposed facility by increasing the amount of energy put to good use.

We have already started talking to local companies about the opportunities to do this. 

what could it look like?

what could it look like?

Find out more about the project

who are MVV?

who are MVV?

MVV Environment is part of the MVV Energie group of companies, providing sustainable and efficient solutions for waste-fired energy generation to publicly and privately-owned waste disposal companies as well as to Local Authorities.

The UK business retains the overall group ethos of ‘belonging’ to the communities we serve whilst benefitting from over 50 years’ experience gained by our German sister companies. In the UK, MVV currently consists of five separate companies:

  • MVV Environment Limited – the UK development company and core business support functions
  • MVV Environment Baldovie – diverting 110,000 tonnes per annum of residual waste from landfill for Dundee City and Angus councils 
  • MVV Environment Devonport –diverting 200,000 tonnes per annum of residual waste from landfill for the South West Devon Waste Partnership as well as 50,000 tonnes per annum of residual waste for private waste disposal companies
  • MVV Environment Ridham – generating energy from 175,000 tonnes per annum of waste wood that would otherwise be landfilled or exported for energy generation abroad
  • MVV Environment Services – the UK electricity trading subsidiary of MVV

Find out more

what experience do MVV have in EfW technology?

what experience do MVV have in EfW technology?

Our largest project in the UK so far is the Devonport Energy from Waste Combined Heat and Power Facility in Plymouth.  Since 2015, this modern and efficient facility has been using around 250,000 tonnes of household, commercial and industrial residual waste per year to generate electricity and heat in Plymouth.  

In the “Partnership Awards” our facility was awarded first prize in three categories –

  • Best Project category
  • Best Waste/Water/Energy Project category
  • Best Local Management Team” category

Find out more

do MVV have experience in other renewable energy technologies?

do MVV have experience in other renewable energy technologies?

Biomass is another key focus of our activities in the British market and demonstrates our responsibility towards society when it comes to promoting the use of renewable energy.  Our biomass power plant at Ridham Dock, Kent, uses 172,000 tonnes of waste and non-recyclable wood per year to generate green electricity and potentially heat as well.

Find out more

what is Energy from Waste?

what is Energy from Waste?

Energy from Waste (or EfW) is the generation of electricity and/or usable heat from non-recyclable waste that would otherwise go to landfill in the UK, or be transported to other countries as ‘Refuse Derived Fuel’ which is then burned to generate electricity and/or heat overseas.

The heat from the burning waste is used to boil water and generate steam which turns a turbine to drive a generator. Efficiencies can be increased if some of the steam can be used for heating, for example in industrial processes such as cooking food.

Find out more

why is EfW a better solution than landfill?

why is EfW a better solution than landfill?

Landfill sites produce methane, which is 25 times worse than CO2 as a greenhouse gas and exporting waste requires it to be shredded, baled and transported far greater distances than treating it locally.  Shredding, baling and transport all generate more CO2, which can be avoided with a local solution.

Find out more

what happens to the electricity and heat generated?

what happens to the electricity and heat generated?

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility would, if approved, be able to supply electricity and heat to certain businesses in the local area, offering those companies lower energy costs and a renewable energy alternative to using fossil fuels. Surplus electricity would be sold on to the national grid.

where will the waste come from?

where will the waste come from?

If approved, the Medworth EfW CHP Facility waste will come from the region. Waste companies will want to deal with waste as close to its source as possible, to control transport costs. 

how much waste will it deal with?

how much waste will it deal with?

In the UK now, there is over 15 million* tonnes of non-recyclable (or residual) waste per year that is still going to landfill or being shipped abroad for disposal.

The plant is designed to treat over half a million tonnes per year of waste. The actual amount will be determined by the energy content of the waste; the lower the energy content, the more that can be treated, conversely with a higher energy content, less waste would be treated.

*source Tolvik Consulting, February 2019

will you be importing waste from overseas?

will you be importing waste from overseas?

No. On average over three million tonnes of waste is currently exported each year to Europe, this is due to the lack of domestic waste management infrastructure.

what wastes will you accept?

what wastes will you accept?

We would source non-hazardous household and business waste from the region which currently goes to landfill or for export. The exact wastes that can be accepted will be specified in an Environmental Permit issued by the Environment Agency based on European Waste Catalogue (EWC) codes.

While the permit is likely to allow a reasonably wide range of suitable non-hazardous wastes, the vast majority of the waste we will accept is most likely to fall within three EWC codes, namely:

  • 20 03 01 – Mixed Municipal Waste
  • 19 12 10 – Combustible Waste (Refuse Derived Fuel)
  • 19 12 12 – Other wastes (including mixtures of materials) from the mechanical treatment of waste

will there be plastic in the waste?

will there be plastic in the waste?

There will be an element of plastic in the waste stream. This represents those types of plastic that cannot yet be easily recycled, as well as plastic that remains after businesses or householders have separated out their recyclable waste. 

Plastics that have been collected for, and are suitable for, recycling cannot be accepted by MVV under the standard conditions of an environmental permit.

will the waste be checked to make sure it doesn't contain anything it shouldn't?

will the waste be checked to make sure it doesn't contain anything it shouldn't?

In the UK, those involved in the production, control, storage, transport or treatment of waste are bound by a Duty of Care as set out in the Environmental Protection Act. As such, the treatment of waste is well controlled and documented. 

Only waste that complies with the environmental permit will be accepted. In the event that non-compliant waste is identified, it will be removed from site for safe disposal/treatment.

why can’t money be spent on improving recycling rates instead?

why can’t money be spent on improving recycling rates instead?

This is a matter for local and County Council. It is worth noting that MVV do not target municipal recyclable waste, and as such our facilities have no direct impact on municipal recycling rates in the county. EfW competes with landfill, not recycling.

if we are moving to a circular economy, can you be sure there will be enough waste for the lifetime of the facility?

if we are moving to a circular economy, can you be sure there will be enough waste for the lifetime of the facility?

MVV supports the transition towards a circular economy. We acknowledge that within a circular economy there will still be materials that have reached the 'end of life' point and are only suitable for energy recovery.

When considering developing a facility, we calculate the amount of waste being produced that is currently either being sent to landfill or exported overseas. We also look at Government targets for recycling and our need to embrace a circular economy, to ascertain how much the available fuel would be reduced if these targets were successfully reached.

what are the benefits to the local community?

what are the benefits to the local community?

The proposed EfW CHP facility at Medworth, has a number of significant local benefits. Many of these benefits are long term and sustainable and contribute significantly to individuals and businesses in Wisbech. The main benefits are:

Our investment of over £300 million is likely to attract further quality development in the area around the site via supply of sustainable electricity and heat.

lower cost renewable energy for local industry

lower cost renewable energy for local industry

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility would, if approved, be able to supply electricity and heat to certain businesses in the local area, offering those companies lower energy costs and a renewable energy alternative to using fossil fuels.

will there be employment opportunities?

will there be employment opportunities?

If the development is approved, it will generate up to 700 jobs throughout the construction period as well as requiring additional goods and services which MVV will always endeavour to source locally.

Beyond construction, the completed facility would employ about 40 staff in a range of skilled roles. In addition to the full-time staffing requirements, we would also need other goods and services such as cleaning, catering and maintenance staff, all of which will generate further local employment.

We will work with local schools, colleges and universities to offer opportunities to upskill local young people in the areas of construction, engineering, waste management and sustainability.

will there be an education programme?

will there be an education programme?

As the Facility will be both a waste management plant and a power plant, we will develop an education programme for local schools, colleges and universities with a focus on waste, resources and renewable energy. 

Community visits to the Facility will also be encouraged to develop a more personal sense of responsibility towards waste management and the need to reduce the amount of waste we produce.

what is the impact on local air quality?

what is the impact on local air quality?

Thanks to state-of-the-art flue gas cleaning, our power facilities comply with the very strict European regulations for clean air.

EfW accounts for a very small part (0.02%) of total particulate emissions in the UK annually. According to the Health Protection Agency, by comparison, industry and traffic account for about 40% of particulate emissions.

is EfW a major source of dioxins?

is EfW a major source of dioxins?

No. In the past, EfW plants were a significant source of dioxins, but following reductions in emission limits in 1995 and 2000, EfW now accounts for less than 1% of the overall dioxin emissions to the air in the UK.

In fact, dioxin emissions from EfW in the UK have changed dramatically, with a 99.8% reduction in dioxin emissions per tonne of waste since 1990. This is due to highly sophisticated flue gas cleaning systems.

what safety measures are designed into the facility to ensure air quality protection, even when there’s an equipment failure?

what safety measures are designed into the facility to ensure air quality protection, even when there’s an equipment failure?

Safety is of the utmost importance and the system is designed to ensure that emissions to air are controlled even in the event of equipment failure.

Sophisticated monitoring techniques throughout the process, from combustion through to filtration of the flue gases ensure that the facility operates within the limits of the Environmental Permit.

will air quality monitoring results be made available to the public?

will air quality monitoring results be made available to the public?

If approved, MVV will voluntarily publish the weekly emission values for the Medworth EfW CHP facility; we will offer interested parties the opportunity to stay informed about the positive environmental impacts of our facility.

A direct comparison of the average daily values with the legal limits will be available on our website.

who monitors waste-to-energy facilities in the UK?

who monitors waste-to-energy facilities in the UK?

The Environment Agency (EA) regulate all waste sites and act as independent ’police’ of a facility’s outputs. If limits were breached, the EA has the power to shut down the plant and impose fines accordingly.

MVV monitors the majority of emissions from the facility continuously. Other trace emissions must be monitored by extractive sampling as they are present in such tiny amounts; this is carried out at regular intervals as required by the Environmental Permit.

The emissions data is logged and stored and reported to the Environment Agency. 

what is the impact on the environment?

what is the impact on the environment?

EfW replaces landfill and contributes to renewable energy generation, reducing the UK’s reliance on fossil fuels and cutting methane (CH4) emissions.

Currently 48% of the UK’s electricity is still generated by burning fossil fuels so there is a need to increase the amount of renewable energy generated.

In the UK, landfill accounts for 30% of methane production, which is 25 times more harmful as a greenhouse gas than CO2.

will the facility smell?

will the facility smell?

Off-site odour will be controlled through a number of operational measures, including good housekeeping.

The waste being delivered to site will be the main source of odour and deliveries will take place inside an enclosed tipping hall.

Smelly air from the tipping hall will be drawn into the combustion chamber and burnt; as a result, fresh air will be drawn into the tipping hall from outside so that the flow of air prevents escape of odours.

will the facility be noisy?

will the facility be noisy?

We have demonstrated at our Plymouth facility that we can operate within 65m of housing without causing a nuisance to the local residents.

Modern cladding and insulation techniques, as well as careful planning of the layout will minimise any noise outside of the site boundary.

what will you do to make sure the facility doesn't attract pests and vermin?

what will you do to make sure the facility doesn't attract pests and vermin?

All responsible waste sites have pest and vermin control measures in place and this will be the case for the Medworth site.

Good housekeeping in terms of litter and odour control will ensure that additional pests and vermin will not be attracted to the site; pests and vermin may, of course, be delivered in/with the waste but these will be confined to the waste bunker from which they cannot escape – they will eventually end up in the furnace!

will environmental impacts be assessed?

will environmental impacts be assessed?

Like all significant development proposals, an Environmental Impact Assessment, for both construction and operation of the facility will be undertaken and reported by MVV in a document called an Environmental Statement.

The Environmental Statement reports on a range of potential environmental impacts and if necessary outlines measures to mitigate these. The scope of environmental impacts to be assessed is formally confirmed by the Planning Inspectorate through a process known as ‘Scoping’.

In preparing its ‘Scoping Opinion’ the Planning Inspectorate will consult prescribed consultees, such as the Environment Agency, Highways Authorities and Public Health England to determine how and what environmental impacts MVV needs to assess.

MVV will be asking the Planning Inspectorate for a Scoping Opinion so we can complete our environmental surveys of the site and its surroundings and prepare the Environmental Statement.

We have to wait for the formal Scoping Opinion to be issued, however based on our experience of developing similar facilities in the UK, we anticipate the likely environmental assessments would include:

  • air quality & health
  • traffic & transportation
  • landscape & visual
  • noise & vibration
  • ecology & nature conservation
  • surface water & flood risk
  • ground conditions
  • heritage
  • socio-economics & land use

Further information about the Scoping process is available on the Planning Inspectorates Website.

how will MVV manage the impact transport and traffic will have?

how will MVV manage the impact transport and traffic will have?

MVV will carefully look at local road networks and available waste in the area in order to develop a transport plan that will minimise impact on the existing infrastructure.

how will you stop facility traffic impacting local work and school traffic?

how will you stop facility traffic impacting local work and school traffic?

An operational traffic and transport plan will be developed to minimise peak hour deliveries and ensure that delivery routes do not conflict (where reasonably practicable) with work and school traffic.

what is a 'Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project'?

what is a 'Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project'?

Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIPs) are large scale developments relating to energy, transport, water and/or waste which meet certain thresholds set out in the Planning Act 2008.

The Medworth EfW CHP Facility is an NSIP because it would have a capacity of more than 50 megawatts.

Find out more

what is a Development Consent Order?

what is a Development Consent Order?

A Development Consent Order (DCO) is a special type of planning permission for developments that are considered to be NSIPs. The process for obtaining a DCO is set out in the Planning Act 2008. 

Instead of the local planning authority, DCO applications are dealt with by the Planning Inspectorate (PINS). PINS examine the application and make a recommendation to the Secretary of State whether to approve or refuse the application. The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy then makes the decision.

Find out more

how does the DCO process work?

how does the DCO process work?

There are six stages in the DCO process:

  • Pre-application
  • Acceptance
  • Pre-examination
  • Examination
  • Recommendation and Decision
  • Post-decision

An overview of each of these stages, including how you would be involved in each stage is set out on the PlNS website.

what is the Planning Inspectorate?

what is the Planning Inspectorate?

The Planning Inspectorate, (PINS), deals with National Infrastructure Project planning applications in England and Wales. Their job is to make decisions about land use and other planning-related issues in a fair, open and timely manner. 

They implement the government’s aims of sustainable development through shaping positive local planning and supporting economic growth in relation to energy, transport, water and/or waste.

PINS implement government policy whilst carefully considering the interests of developers, local citizens and other interested parties.

Find out more

how do I contact the Planning Inspectorate?

PINS have set up a dedicated project website where formal documents relating to our project can be downloaded.

These documents can be accessed on their website here.

If you would like to contact PINS about our project, you can email them at medworth@planninginspectorate.gov.uk

what happens next?

what happens next?

We are developing the proposals for this project and it is especially important that we seek the views of local people and local councils. Our history as a public utilities company in Germany endures in our approach to new developments and we understand how important local people are to any new project. 

We will firstly ask the Planning Inspectorate for a Scoping Opinion so we can complete our environmental surveys of the site and its surroundings and prepare the Environmental Statement.

We will then hold a series of consultation events, where you will be able to have your say on the project and MVV staff will be available to answer questions and explain what the project will entail. These consultations will provide you with the opportunity to influence and comment on the project, whether you agree with it, disagree with it, or believe it can be improved.

The consultation process will welcome comments and questions from the local community and businesses as well as a range of other stakeholders.

 

These events were originally scheduled during the weeks beginning 30th March and 20th April. Having monitored the Coronavirus situation in the UK closely over the past few days, and based on the most recently updated Government guidance, MVV has postponed the planned public events until further notice.

Postponing these events is not a decision we have taken lightly. We are committed to playing an active role in engaging with the local community and this first non-statutory consultation is an important opportunity to introduce our proposals and gather feedback.

Click here for updates on the rearrangement of our non-statutory public consultation events.

how will MVV engage with the local community?

how will MVV engage with the local community?

Our history as a public utilities company endures in our approach to new developments and we understand how important local people are to any new project. Throughout the consultation and consideration process, we will employ local companies and hire local venues to hold events in order to better understand the community we are joining.

Throughout any development, we always aim to act considerately and listen carefully to the opinions of those around us. We will employ a Community Liaison Manager from the local area so that there is always someone to communicate with face-to-face. We have always operated an ‘open door’ policy both during the planning and development process and beyond.

Our priorities as a business are always people, environment, profit – in that order.

Our staff, customers and communities are of the utmost importance and we want to hear from you. 

how can I find out more?

how can I find out more?

This website will be updated regularly.

In the meantime, you can email us on medworth@mvvuk.co.uk if you have any questions.  

how can I have my say?

how can I have my say?

There is an online form below, and in due course public consultation events will be widely advertised. 

These will be held at a variety of venues in the Wisbech area to facilitate attendance and benefit local businesses.

Find out more about consultation events


can’t find the information you’re looking for?

Simply fill out the form below and a member of our team will respond to you as soon as possible

Products
Products
Services
Other

Your contact details
Mr
Mr
Mrs
Ms
Miss
Dr
Other

I agree to my data being processed exclusively for the purpose of answering my enquiry. Any personal data submitted to MVV will be handled in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

No Yes We use cookies to provide you with the best possible experience. Cookies are also shared with Google Analytics to help monitor this site's performance. Do you consent? Click here to find out more.